Thought for the Day

Napoleon Hill’s Thought for the Day

Chickens come home to roost, and so do your thoughts. Be careful what sort of thoughts you send out.

The thoughts you send out to others will have a far greater impact upon you than upon them. Unlike a material possession, when you release a thought or give it to someone else, it also stays with you. It may remain buried in your subconscious long after your conscious mind has forgotten about it. Like chickens that return to the coop at night, such thoughts may flash into your consciousness when you least expect them. When your thoughts are positive, you never have to worry about the damage you may do to yourself through negative thinking. Cheerful, productive, happy thoughts that are buried in your subconscious bring positive results when they recur, and by their presence they encourage the maintenance of a positive attitude in all that you do.

2019-03-25T08:56:25+00:00 March 26th, 2019|Thought for the Day|

The man who does his job precisely as he would do it if he owned the business may see the day when he will own that business or a better one.

The best-managed companies are those in which management creates opportunities for employees to own a piece of the business through various types of stock-ownership programs. Management has found that when individual employees are also owners, they are more loyal, more creative, and more cost-conscious. They also work harder and are more responsive to customers. If you have the opportunity to participate in employee stock programs, do so. If possible, extend the same opportunity to your employees. If such programs are not available to you, conduct yourself as though you were already an owner, and sooner or later you will be. It is inevitable that when you think like an owner, you will eventually become one.

2019-03-25T08:54:16+00:00 March 25th, 2019|Thought for the Day|

The average person would have quit at the first failure. That’s why there have been many average men and only one Edison.

Thomas Edison once observed that the reason most folks don’t recognize opportunity when it comes knocking is that it is often dressed in coveralls and looks like work. Edison knew that anything worthwhile never comes easily; if it were easy, anyone could do it. Because he persisted far beyond the point the average person would consider reasonable and rational, he produced inventions that even the most learned people of the day considered impossible. Great advances in knowledge are often achieved by people with an almost fanatical devotion to finding the solution to a problem. Flashes of inspiration alone are not enough to ensure success; they must be followed by determined, persistent action.

2019-03-21T15:39:06+00:00 March 24th, 2019|Thought for the Day|

Unless you are an army officer, you can get better results by requests than you can by orders.

Armies spend endless hours training people to follow orders without question. It’s an essential quality in a soldier. In everyday life, however, things don’t work that way. Business, political, and civic leaders have learned that ordinary people will perform exceptional tasks when they are asked-not ordered-to do so. Even when you are managing other people, you will achieve far more if you convert every order to a request. Introductory phrases such as, “Would you mind …” or, “Could I ask your assistance in …” or the always effective, “Please …” will ensure success far more often than intimidating those who work for you. And when you need help from those whose paychecks you do not control, you will find them far more responsive to requests than to orders.

2019-03-21T15:35:02+00:00 March 23rd, 2019|Thought for the Day|

A wise man watches his faults more closely than his virtues; fools reverse the order.

We all have within us the potential for greatness or for failure. Both possibilities are an innate part of our character. Whether we reach for the stars or plunge to the depths of despair depends in large measure on how we manage our positive and negative potential. It is doubtful that, if left unchecked, your virtues will rage out of control. Unfortunately, the reverse is not true about your faults. Left unattended, faults have a way of multiplying until they eventually choke out your good qualities. The surest way to control your faults is to attack them the moment they appear.

2019-03-20T20:46:13+00:00 March 21st, 2019|Thought for the Day|

Wise persons are those who think twice before speaking once.

Perhaps the greatest quality in a leader and the most valuable skill in building relationships is the ability to think before you speak. If you have a tendency to speak hastily in anger and regret your actions at leisure, the childhood admonition to count to ten before speaking will still serve you well. When you pause — if only for a moment — to consider the consequences, you may think better of what you were about to say. And if you must speak strongly, it’s a good idea to sugarcoat the words — just in case you have to eat them later.

2019-03-18T17:54:31+00:00 March 19th, 2019|Thought for the Day|

The worst thing about worry is that it attracts a whole flock of relatives.

Worries, like sheep, seem to flock together. One worry leads to another, and soon you are overwhelmed with the potential for problems. When you allow yourself to play the “what if?” game — to speculate about additional problems that one potential problem might cause — worries multiply, each making the next seem worse. If you must play the “What if?” game, play it to win. Focus on solutions, not on the problems themselves and the additional problems they might create. However serious your worries may seem when they awaken you at midnight, if you analyze them carefully, you will find that every problem has a solution.

2019-03-17T19:25:33+00:00 March 18th, 2019|Thought for the Day|